Expansion Board 3 user button Pin



  • Apologies if this is dumb and repeated question but, I don't seem to be able to find a definitive answer anywhere.

    What Pin is the user button on the expansion board 3 (3.1 in my case) connected to?



  • @TurkDangerCat said in Expansion Board 3 user button Pin:

    @rcolistete Thanks for that, helpful, one small thing, you may have a typo here: "low power consumption in deep sleep mode, minimum of 34 mA with WiPy3 and battery supplying 3.61-3.66 V in the JST PH 2.0 connector, similar to the 33 uA promised by Pycom;"

    Did you mean mA and uA (as 34mA is not close to 33uA :-) )

    Yes, it was a typo, the correct is 34 uA. Thanks, I've fixed it.


  • Global Moderator

    Hi,

    Thanks for the feedback! I have been working to improve the documentation, it just takes a lot of my time. I will add the information once I get there! Your additional instructions / documentation looks really nice!

    Best,
    Gijs



  • @rcolistete Thanks for that, helpful, one small thing, you may have a typo here: "low power consumption in deep sleep mode, minimum of 34 mA with WiPy3 and battery supplying 3.61-3.66 V in the JST PH 2.0 connector, similar to the 33 uA promised by Pycom;"

    Did you mean mA and uA (as 34mA is not close to 33uA :-) )

    Not sure any of that helps me much though, I am designing a number of boards and trying to rely upon such poorly written and inconsistent documentation (by Pycom) means I am taking a much bigger risk adding a LoPy to my design than I should. I can't even find any mechanical diagrams for the expansion boards.





  • Yes, what the hell is going on with the bizarre number schemes?! At least have have pin numbers that relate to the physical locations of the bloody pins, you know, like pin one is the first pin! Then everything else can hang off that for the different pin functions. I am 50/50 going to abandon my plans to use Pycom as it's taking me hours to work out what is and isn't connected to what!



  • @goldfishalpha

    FWIW, I am using the code below to work with S1. I am trying to use a timer to debounce the button press. This will fail on long button presses. Any advice is appreciated.

    from machine import Pin
    from machine import Timer
    
    # Exapansion board S1 is P10 / G17
    
    # When not pressed, this code will read 1
    # When pressed, this code will read 0
    pin = Pin('P10', mode=Pin.IN, pull=Pin.PULL_UP)
    # print(pin())
    
    
    
    # P-Number	G-Number	GPIO
    # P0	    G2	        GPIO3
    # P1	    G1	        GPIO1
    # P2	    G23	        GPIO0
    # P3	    G24	        GPIO4
    # P4	    G11	        GPIO15
    # P5	    G12	        GPIO5
    # P6	    G13	        GPIO27
    # P7	    G14	        GPIO19
    # P8	    G15	        GPIO2
    # P9	    G16	        GPIO12
    # P10	    G17	        GPIO13
    # P11	    G22	        GPIO22
    # P12	    G28	        GPIO21
    # P13	    G5	        GPIO36
    # P14	    G4	        GPIO37
    # P15	    G0	        GPIO38
    # P16	    G3	        GPIO39
    # P17	    G31	        GPIO35
    # P18	    G30	        GPIO34
    # P19	    G6	        GPIO32
    # P20	    G7	        GPIO33
    # P21	    G8	        GPIO26
    # P22	    G9	        GPIO25
    # P23	    G10	        GPIO14
    
    # Robert-hh Corrections
    #
    # P1=G1=GPIO1
    # P10=G18=GPIO13
    # P19=G6=GPIO32
    # P21=G8=GPIO26
    # P23=G10=GPIO14
    
    
    # Ensure handler is not registered
    pin.callback(Pin.IRQ_FALLING | Pin.IRQ_RISING, handler=None)
    
    
    # The callback routine is not debounced
    # The print message below could happen multiple times
    def pin_handler_non_debounced(arg):
        print("got an interrupt on pin %s" % (arg.id()))
    
    # pin.callback(Pin.IRQ_FALLING | Pin.IRQ_RISING, pin_handler_non_debounced)
    
    
    # Long presses will still trigger multiple key detects
    def pin_handler_debounced(arg_is_pin):
        #print("pin_handler_debounced()")
    
        # Disable the callback until we exit
        # Option 1 - use pin.callback()
        #  This is a global, we are using a reference.
        #  use global pin if we want to change the value
        # Option 2 - use arg
        #  The pin which generate the callback is passed in to handler
        arg_is_pin.callback(Pin.IRQ_FALLING | Pin.IRQ_RISING, handler=None)
    
        chrono = Timer.Chrono()            # create timer
        chrono.reset()                    # reset timer to zero
        chrono.start()                    # start timer
        start_time_ms = chrono.read_ms()  # start timer
        end_time_ms = start_time_ms
        # Ignore pin interrupts for 1000 ms
        while(end_time_ms < (start_time_ms + 1000)):
            #print("chrono read_ms")
            #print("End time %d" % (end_time_ms))
            #print("Start time %d" % (start_time_ms))
            end_time_ms = chrono.read_ms()
    
        print("got an interrupt on pin %s" % (arg_is_pin.id()))
    
        # Re-enable the callback
        arg_is_pin.callback(Pin.IRQ_FALLING | Pin.IRQ_RISING, pin_handler_debounced)
    
    
    
    
    pin.callback(Pin.IRQ_FALLING | Pin.IRQ_RISING, pin_handler_debounced)
    


  • @goldfishalpha

    I got it to work using G17.

    pin = Pin('G17', mode=Pin.IN, pull=Pin.PULL_UP)
    print(pin())
    


  • In a shock move today Pycom have announced they are ditching the three competing pin ID schemes in favour of labelling them with the names of Saturn's moons. Starting at the reset button & proceeding towards the wifi antenna connector the new pin notations are Titan, Enceladus, Mimas, .....etc, with G42/GPIO21/P12 now known as Methone.



  • @goldfishalpha the completely useless Pycom documentation with its many different and conflicting numbering schemes strikes again.

    I believe it’s P14, but given the fact that it has different names (including two different GPIO* names), one can be excused if they don’t get it right.

    Pycom, are you ever going to do something about this?


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